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‘Me too’ products can cause potential harm to human body, as well as environment

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Most of so-called ‘corona shield’ masks are made using silver, zinc or other technologies containing heavy metal content which leach out of textile, can cause harmful effects, are potentially carcinogenic

Switzerland-based Livinguard AG  has re-affirmed that its pioneering and revolutionary invention is currently the world’s only non-leaching technology which can continuously and safely inactivate viruses and bacteria, including 99.9 per cent of SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19), making Livinguard the safest and most effective Coronavirus killing technology known to date.

Unfortunately, however, deceptive, and misleading ‘me too’ products which can cause potential harm to the human body, as well as the environment and are claiming to be ‘anti corona’ have been found to misinform consumers by concealing the efficacy and safety of their technology. Most of these so-called ‘corona shield’ masks are made using silver, zinc or other technologies containing heavy metal content which leach out of the textile and can cause harmful effects and are potentially carcinogenic. Certain marketeers have been miscommunicating and overstating their performance data as well as withholding this important safety information, thereby misinforming users and jeopardising their health. What’s important to know about such technologies?

  • Known as ‘leaching’ technologies ie they are not permanently bound to the fabric. This means that they can be swallowed or inhaled, when used in face masks. 
  • Toxic effects of inhalation and ingestion of such chemicals have been widely demonstrated and cited in reputed peer reviewed journals and mainstream scientific literature.
  • The marketeers of such technologies used in face masks fail to provide data on safety to the mucous membrane lining human lungs.
  • In addition to human safety, one should also consider the safety of allowing such technologies to find their way into waste water streams and our environment, as there is also sufficient data in the public domain pertaining to the environmental damage this causes.
  • Global regulations surrounding such technologies are being increasingly reclassified and their use limited.

Although such technologies have been used in various products, regulators in most markets generally require safety disclosures. However, no such regulations have existed for their use in face masks and some organisations have disregarded the consequences of consumers potentially inhaling these toxic chemicals.

Scientific results have followed on similar findings from The University of Arizona, Tucson and are especially relevant now as countries gradually ease lockdown restrictions and populations seek a return to the next new normal.

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